WORK IN PROGRESS

Soup Stories (working title)

The word soup comes from French soupe (“soup,” “broth”), which comes through Latin suppa (“bread soaked in broth”), from which also comes the word “sop,” a piece of bread used to soak up soup or a thick stew. Though today the varieties are endless, through much of human history, this meal was much simpler, requiring nothing more than a hunk of meat or vegetable in warm water. Humans were concocting soup at least 25,000 years ago. That’s some staying power! Soup is so popular, it even has its own day—February 4—a day when you will either be celebrating the end of winter or lamenting 6 more weeks of snow and cold based on the appearance of a rodent named Phil in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, just two days earlier. Either way, it’s a perfect day for a steamy bowl of veggie or meat medley.

Soup is easily one of my favorite meals. I was hooked when I made my first batch of homemade cream of mushroom soup that rivaled any I’d ever tasted. Delicious, nutritious, inexpensive, easy, fresh, homemade. I would never buy canned soup again. I search out delicious recipes and prepare soup at least once per week, twice in the winter. I constantly tweak, adding and subtracting ingredients, until I get the perfect layer of flavors. One friend commented I should open a food truck and serve only soup and I’ve often contemplated pursuing this venture.

Soup Stories is not just another recipe book. I want the story behind the soup: Was it a family recipe handed down through generations or modified from your favorite food blogger? Does the soup have magical medicinal powers that you swear will cure anything from asthma to zits? The recipes will stimulate their own level of curiosity. Where the hell do I buy pigs’ feet? Do I even want to taste soup made with pigs’ feet? What makes New Mom Soup so special?

Soup Stories will comprise approximately 40 different soups and the stories behind the recipes. Got a great recipe and a story to go with it? Submit your recipe along with 1,500-word essay. The recipes should be easy enough for anyone who picks up the book. The ingredients, likewise, should be simple and available at most grocery stores or even sourced from your own garden. 

PUBLICATIONS

True Stories
The Narrative Project Volume IV

Volume IV of True Stories will introduce you to the graduates and coaches of The Narrative Project (TNP), a dynamic organization that gives writers everything they need to get their books done. Led by author, teacher, and writing coach, Cami Ostman, TNP ushers writers through the process of taking a book from concept to product in hand. These stories are evidence that community and commitment work hand-in-hand to make writers’ dreams come true.

Lisa’s entry, “Let in the Light,” is her first piece of published fiction and explores the dark and light in some of our most meaningful relationships. 

Square Up
50,000 miles in search of a way home

Have you ever wished you could run away and leave your life behind? Born on the “Day of the Wanderer,” Lisa Dailey has always been filled with wanderlust. Although she and her husband had planned to take their family on a ’round-the-world adventure, she didn’t expect their plans to come together on the heels of grief, after losing seven family members in five years. Square Up shows us that travel not only helps us understand and appreciate other cultures, but invites us to find compassion and wisdom, heal from our losses, and discover our capacity for forgiveness, as well as joy.

True Stories
The Narrative Project Volume III

Volume III of True Stories will introduce you to the graduates and coaches of The Narrative Project (TNP), a dynamic organization that gives writers everything they need to get their books done. Led by author, teacher, and writing coach, Cami Ostman, TNP ushers writers through the process of taking a book from concept to product in hand. These stories are evidence that community and commitment work hand-in-hand to make writers’ dreams come true.

This Uncommon Solitude

This Uncommon Solitude captures the myriad and diverse experiences of Red Wheelbarrow Writers during these times of quarantine and the COVID-19 pandemic. We reach out to connect but we can’t physically touch each other. We are shaken by news of widespread suffering and death caused by a novel virus that inexorably spirals out of control. We feel powerless and isolated. Ongoing catastrophes of racism and environmental decline trouble our hearts. For many of us, poetry has helped to connect us, one to another, as we share experiences and insights, express our grief and sadness, fears and pain, gratitude and hope. In joining together, we feel our way forward as best we can toward making sense of our transformed world.

Take a Stand
Art Against Hate

This collection contains poems, stories and images from 117 writers, 53 artists, with 69 illustrations, divided into five fluid and intersecting sections: Legacies, We Are Here, Why?, Evidence, and Resistance. We begin with Legacies because the current increased climate of hate in this country didn’t begin with the 2016 election, and to find its roots we must look to U.S. history—to where the U.S. began—with the genocide of Native Americans and enslavement of Africans. From there the section loosely winds its way through time to touch on crucial events and different chapters of our nation’s history up to the present.

Lisa has a photograph included in this collection. 

Visit https://www.facebook.com/groups/rcnow/ for a virtual book reading by contributors to this anthology.

Discovery

This anthology of stories and poems is in celebration of the 2020 Whatcom READS featured book, To the Bright Edge of the World, by Eowyn Ivey. Find out more at https://www.whatcomreads.org/.

Lisa’s essay, “#OffTheBeatenTrack,” explores the idea of hiding the natural world away from future generations.

“That is the excitement. We catch only glimpses, a burst of movement a flap of wings, yet it is life itself beating at shadow’s edge. It is the unfolding of potential; all of what we might experience and see and learn awaits us.” —Eowyn Ivey, To the Bright Edge of the World

True Stories
The Narrative Project Volume I

The essay, “Blessed in Singapore,” (an excerpt from her memoir, Square Up) details Lisa’s experiences in Singapore with her family. Struggling with grief and the rocky relationship with her mother, Lisa is blessed by a Buddhist monk and embraces the message of purifying negative energies and finds that her heart is lighter. She understands that she must actively work on her thoughts and emotions in order to see change. The time in Singapore sets the stage for the rest of the family’s journey around the world. 

So Much Depends Upon…

Behold the egg!  Smooth, rounded, perfectly formed, fragile, its glowing center suspended in a malleable, translucent penumbra.  The same might be said of these thirty-five memoirs in which the past—formed at the fragile nexus, the malleable boundary of memory and imagination—is suspended in prose, contained in an essay.  You have but to crack open this book.

The essay, “One Word, Two Little Letters,” (an excerpt from Lisa’s memoir, Square Up) tells the story of her relationship with her childhood best friend and how that bond was broken. So much can depend upon so little… a handful of words can lift your spirits or gravely wound a friendship and the smallest of words—just two little letters—can destroy it forever.

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